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Coated seeds may enable agriculture on marginal lands

United States English

Providing seeds with a protective coating that also supplies essential nutrients to the germinating plant could make it possible to grow crops in otherwise unproductive soils, according to new research at MIT. A team of engineers has coated seeds with silk that has been treated with a kind of bacteria that naturally produce a nitrogen fertilizer, to help the germinating plants develop. Tests have shown that these seeds can grow successfully in soils that are too salty to allow untreated seeds to develop normally. The researchers hope this process, which can be applied inexpensively and without the need for specialized equipment, could open up areas of land to farming that are now considered unsuitable for agriculture.

The findings are being published this week in the journal PNAS, in a paper by graduate students Augustine Zvinavashe '16 and Hui Sun, postdoc Eugen Lim, and professor of civil and environmental engineering Benedetto Marelli. The work grew out of Marelli's previous research on using silk coatings as a way to extend the shelf life of seeds used as food crops. "When I was doing some research on that, I stumbled on biofertilizers that can be used to increase the amount of nutrients in the soil," he says. These fertilizers use microbes that live symbiotically with certain plants and convert nitrogen from the air into a form that can be readily taken up by the plants.

Not only does this provide a natural fertilizer to the plant crops, but it avoids problems associated with other fertilizing approaches, he says: "One of the big problems with nitrogen fertilizers is they have a big environmental impact, because they are very energetically demanding to produce." These artificial fertilizers may also have a negative impact on soil quality, according to Marelli. Although these nitrogen-fixing bacteria occur naturally in soils around the world, with different local varieties found in different regions, they are very hard to preserve outside of their natural soil environment. But silk can preserve biological material, so Marelli and his team decided to try it out on these nitrogen-fixing bacteria, known as rhizobacteria.